Michael R. Lewis is a retired corporate executive and entrepreneur. During his 40+ year career, Lewis created and sold ten different companies ranging from oil exploration to healthcare software. He has also been a Registered Investment Adviser with the SEC, a Principal of one of the larger management consulting firms in the country, and a Senior Vice President of the largest not-for-profit health insurer in the United States. Mike's articles on personal investments, business management, and the economy are available on several online publications. He's a father and grandfather, who also writes non-fiction and biographical pieces about growing up in the plains of West Texas - including The Storm.
By understanding your risk tolerance, you can avoid those investments which are likely to make you anxious. Generally speaking, you should never own an asset which keeps you from sleeping in the night. Anxiety stimulates fear which triggers emotional responses (rather than logical responses) to the stressor. During periods of financial uncertainty, the investor who can retain a cool head and follows an analytical decision process invariably comes out ahead.
Even when the stock price has performed as expected, there are questions: Should I take a profit now before the price falls? Should I keep my position since the price is likely to go higher? Thoughts like these will flood your mind, especially if you constantly watch the price of a security, eventually building to a point that you will take action. Since emotions are the primary driver of your action, it will probably be wrong.
The Intelligent Investor by Ben Graham ought to be required reading for every private investor. While the innovations he brought to stock analysis have long been outdated and the red flags he used to watch out for in a company's accounts are now regulated against by the SEC, many of his insights about thinking about investment still stand. For example, his description of Mr Market is still an excellent way of understanding how a crowd moves with the daily news.
Whilst some day traders are tuned in every day from 09:30 to 16:30 EST (for the U.S stock market), many trade for just a 2-3 hour window instead. As a beginner especially this will prevent you making careless mistakes as your brain drops down a couple of gears when your concentration wanes. The hours you’ll want to focus your attention on are as follows:
Don't borrow money to use for stock market investment. On the stock exchange, borrowed money is known as either gearing or leverage. It is typically used either by companies (to help them finance growth), investment banks and hedge funds (to help juice their returns) or very aggressive traders. There are many spread betting (information here), options trading and day trading strategies that use borrowed money to enhance returns, but it also has a very profound impact on the risks being taken with each trade.
3. Harness technology – With thousands of other traders out there, you need to utilise all the resources around you to stay ahead. With that being said, charting platforms offer a huge number of ways to analyse the markets. You can also backtest your strategy against historical data to fill in any cracks. Mobile apps will also ensure you have instant access to the market, almost anywhere. Combine that with a lightning fast internet connection and you can make fast, informed and accurate decisions.
Schwab is a full-service investment firm which offers services and technology to everyone from self-directed active traders to people who want the guidance of a financial advisor. It has a wide variety of platforms from which to choose, as well as full banking capabilities. It is, however, Schwab’s ETF screener on the StreetSmart Edge platform that will capture the attention of ETF investors. The StreetSmart Edge ETF screener has over 150 criteria that can combine fundamental, technical, and third party data. The ETF screener is extremely customizable and your criteria combinations can be saved for future re-use. Schwab’s news and research offerings overall were also among the deepest of all the brokerages we reviewed, sealing up this category for the industry giant.
A demo account is a great way for beginners to practice trading and test a broker or trading platform without using real money. A demo account is funded with simulated money, so you can try out the broker’s platform features and get familiar with acting on the markets. A warning though – even the best practice platform can’t replicate the pressures that comes with having real money on the line, but it’s a great way to learn the basics and get started with zero risk.
The best way to practice: With a stock market simulator or paper-trading account. Many brokers offer these virtual trading platforms, and they essentially allow you to play the stock market with Monopoly money. Not only do you get to familiarize yourself with trading platforms and how they work, but you also get to test various trading strategies without losing real money. The link above has a list of brokers that offer these play platforms.
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